Quick and Simple Tam

tam

Tam

 

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Knit in the round from the center of the top down to the brim.

Start out by swatching your yarn and measuring your head. I used bulky yarn and size 10 needles. I stretched the swatch to mimic a snug fit around my head (if you want a looser fit, don’t stretch) which gave me about 6 stitches over 4 inches or 1.5 stitches per inch. The measurement of where I wanted the brim of my tam to be on my head was 22 inches.

Multiply the inches by the number of stitches per inch. In my example, it was 22×1.5=33. This is the number of stitches for the brim.
Double the number of stitches for the brim to get the stitch count for the largest part of the hat. 33×2=66 for mine.

Divide that number by 16 to get your cast on stitch count. 66÷16=4.125. I rounded down to 4 here and planned to make up any difference in stitch count at the decrease for the brim if I felt the need.
If you’re using lighter weight yarn and your cast on stitch count is more than 8, you can divide that number by 2 and add another increase round at round 32.

Cast on, spreading the stitches over 4 double points or on two or one circular needles, however you like to knit in the round.

1. Knit around.
2. Increase (also on rounds 4, 8, and 16): K1, yarn over (yo) to end of round. If you don’t want eyelet circles in the top of your tam, you can use any increase stitch you like instead of a yo.
Knit around on all other rounds.

By round 16 (or 32, if using lighter yarn) you should have reached your highest stitch count number. I was a little short at 64 stitches because of rounding down at cast on.

Knit until your hat measures 4 inches (more or less, depending on your taste) from the last increase round.

Knit 2 together to end of round. If I had followed this, I would have ended up with 32 stitches, so I skipped the last decrease and knit both of the last two stitches separately to get 33.

Knit another inch or so and bind off. This will create a rolled edge. If you’d like to do a knit 1, purl 1 ribbing, you could do that easily as long as your final stitch count is an even number.

You are welcome to distribute this pattern and use the ideas included and gift or sell whatever you make from it. But if you distribute it, please do so as a whole, with attribution and this info included. Thanks!

Creative Commons License
This work by Suzanne Lander is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

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Katy’s Gloves

A pattern for medium to large kids’ gloves in worsted weight yarn on size 3.25mm (US3) needles.

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This pattern is for medium to large kids’ gloves (for smaller kids, I’d suggest mittens!)

 

Yarn: about 100 yards of worsted weight wool

 

Needles: US3 (either 30-40″ circulars for magic loop or double points)

 

Gauge: 10 stitches by 16 rows over 2 inches in stockinette

 

Cast on 36 stitches

 

K1, p1 ribbing for 15 rows

 

Knit in pattern (stockinette or whatever you like) for 5 more rows

 

Increase for thumb over next 10 rows:

K17, m1, k2, m1, k17

knit plain

repeat (46 stitches at end)

 

K17, k1 front and back, place next 10 stitches on stitch holder for thumb, k18

Knit in stockinette for 10 rows

 

Put stitches on stitch holder, palm stitches facing one side and back of hand stitches facing the other.

Use magic loop or 3 dpns for fingers and thumb. For 3 dpns, two needles will hold stitches and you’ll knit with the 3rd.

 

Pinkie finger:

Place 4 stitches on front needle and 5 on back needle

K3, k1 front and back, k5

Continue in pattern for 11 rows

K2tog to end of round (5 stitches)

Thread yarn through all stitches and pull tight to close

 

Ring finger:

Place 5 stitches on front needle and 4 on back needle

K4, k1 front and back, k5, pick up 1 stitch from the increase in the pinkie finger

continue in pattern for 17 rows

K2tog to end of round, k1 (6 stitches)

Thread yarn through all stitches and pull tight to close

 

Middle finger:

Place 4 stitches on front needle and 5 on back needle

Pick up 1 stitch from the increase in the ring finger, k3, k1 front and back, k5

Continue in pattern for 19 rows

K2tog to end of round, k1 (6 stitches)

Thread yarn through all stitches and pull tight to close

 

Index finger:

Place 5 stitches on front needle and 4 stitches on back needle.

K10, pick up 1 stitch from the increase in the middle finger

continue in pattern for 17 rows

K2tog to end of round, k1 (6 stitches)

Thread yarn through all stitches and pull tight to close

 

Thumb:

Place 5 stitches on each needle.

Pick up 1, k10, pick up 1

continue in pattern for 13 rows

K2tog to end of round (6 stitches)

Thread yarn through all stitches and pull tight to close

 

Weave in any loose ends

You are welcome to distribute this pattern and use the ideas included and gift or sell whatever you make from it. But if you distribute it, please do so as a whole, with attribution and this info included. Thanks!

Creative Commons License
This work by Suzanne Lander is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Tulip Shawl/Blanket Chart

New pattern.

Tulip

Tulip

tulip key

tulip chart small

This pattern is free, but if you’d like you can add to my tip jar (zusana at gmail dot com) via PayPal.

You are welcome to distribute this pattern and use the ideas included and gift or sell whatever you make from it. But if you distribute it, please do so as a whole, with attribution and this info included. Thanks!

Creative Commons License
This work by Suzanne Lander is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Wool Soaker

Another old pattern.
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Size 5 US needles and worsted weight yarn or whatever you need to get gauge of
21 stitches and 30 rows over 4 inches (updated August 2011)

Using a circular needle or double pointed needles:

Cast on 90 for medium [70 for small, 110 for large]

Waist Ribbing
k1, p1, repeat this to end of row
repeat previous row until you’ve finished 20 rows (you may want to do 30 rows for a large soaker)

Hips
st st for 40 [30, 40] rows

Bottom and Crotch
If you want to weave the ends together — bind off 40 [30, 50] stitches then knit to end of row
If you want to graft them together — bind off 10 [5, 10] stitches, k20 [20, 30], bind off 10 [5, 10], knit to end of row and move the separated 20 stitches to a stitch holder

Work the remaining 50 [40, 60] stitches as if on single pointed needles (you can switch to them if you want):
slip first stitch knitwise, k2tog, knit to end of row
slip first stitch purlwise, p2tog, purl to end of row
repeat previous two rows until you have 20 [20, 30] stitches on the needle (about 30 [20, 30] rows)
to continue with the crotch:
slip first stitch knitwise then knit to end of row
slip first stitch purlwise then purl to end of row
repeat previous two rows until you’ve finished 50 [40, 60] rows

You can weave or graft this end to the front of the soaker before or after you knit the ribbing for the legs.

Leg Ribbing
using single pointed needles if you wait to connect the crotch or double pointed
needles if you’ve already done it:
pick up an even number of stitches at 5 stitches per inch around the legs
knit one full row
k1, p1, repeat this to the end of row
repeat previous row 29 more times then bind off loosely

If you haven’t joined the two ends at the crotch, do so now and weave the ends of the leg ribbing together, too!

You are welcome to distribute this pattern and use the ideas included and gift or sell whatever you make from it. But if you distribute it, please do so as a whole, with attribution and this info included. Thanks!

Creative Commons License
This work by Suzanne Lander is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

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Here we go.

Ok. I had this ambitious idea that I’d find a way to move my knitting blog whole… yeah.

Instead, I’m continuing it here like a sane person would do! I mean, I don’t think I’m getting rid of my other Blogger blogs so I’ll still have the account and it’ll all still be there and all that.

So. If for some reason you’re interested in reading old knitting posts, they’re at the old version of this blog.

The reason I’m moving my knitting blog is for patterns. I don’t have many, but I’ve got a couple and I figure I might as well post them. But unless I turn them into pictures, it’s kind of wonky to post them on Blogger. I plan to attempt it here.

Doll Dress

This pattern is free, but if you’d like you can add to my tip jar (cshardie@gmail.com) via PayPal.

You are welcome to distribute this patterns and use the ideas included and gift or sell whatever you make from it. But if you distribute it, please do so as a whole, with attribution and this info included. Thanks!

Creative Commons License
This work by Suzanne Lander is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

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